Tag Archives: classical music

Ticket Giveaway: The Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s ‘New Creations Festival’: Tanya Tagaq (Saturday, March 4, 2017 – 8:00pm)

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Inuit throat singer and artist Tanya Tagaq won the Polaris Prize for best Canadian album in 2014, for Animism. Those who thought she had then made her definitive artistic statement are in for a surprise.

Also in for a shock are those who thought international success, playing to major festivals and packed houses all over the world, would lead to a mellower sound, or a more laid back approach.

Tagaq follows up Animism with Retribution, an even more musically aggressive, more aggressively political, more challenging, more spine tingling, more powerful masterpiece.

The Inuit people live on the cutting edge of the climate emergency. As sea ice dwindles at astonishing rates, they are witnessing the death of the entire Arctic ecosystem, as the colonialist machine rolls on, mining newly uncovered areas for diamonds. And the Inuit know the truth about the contemporary natures of the crimes at the center of Canada’s identity. Tagaq herself is a survivor of Canada’s infamous genocidal Residential School System, something most Canadians would rather imagine as a dealt-with thing of the distant past.

The Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s ‘New Creations Festival’ has snapped up Tanya Tagaq to highlight their ‘New Creations Festival’ with light in these dark winter months.

The Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s ‘New Creations Festival’ program ranges from an imposing work for piano and orchestra by Jörg Widmann to the World Premières of works by the TSO’s RBC Affiliate Composer Jordan Pal and Tanya Tagaq, written with Christine Duncan and Jean Martin, with orchestrations by Christopher Mayo.

Thank you to our friends at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra for gifting Thirty Four Flavours with a pair of tickets to the ‘New Creations Festival’: Tanya Tagaq (Saturday, March 4, 2017 – 8:00pm) performance!

What are the rules when entering the Thirty Four Flavours and Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway?

Simple! Please sign up to Thirty Four Flavours Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thirtyfourflavours, Twitter https://twitter.com/34flavours, or email subscription to enter the draw. When you have signed up please send me a Facebook message, a tweet or email (thirtyfourflavours@gmail.com) telling me you why you want to win the Symphony tickets.

Deadline for the Thirty Four Flavours and the ‘New Creations Festival’: Tanya Tagaq Ticket Giveaway is Monday February 27, 2017.

If you don’t win tickets, make sure you grab a NEW CREATIONS FESTIVAL PASS! See all 3 shows for only $30! Limited quantity.

https://www.tso.ca/concert/tanya-tagaq

http://tanyatagaq.com/

Review: The Canadian Opera Company’s “The Magic Flute” from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (February 1, 3, 4, 7, 10, 16, 18, 19 and 24, 2017)

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It’s a fairy-tale start to 2017 with the revival of the Canadian Opera Company’s playful and whimsical production of Mozart’s beloved opera, The Magic Flute. Bernard Labadie, one of Canada’s pre-eminent conductors, makes his COC debut with one of the most popular operas in the world with a cast of international and Canadian rising stars. The Magic Flute was last performed by the COC in 2011 and returns February 1, 3, 4, 7, 10, 16, 18, 19 and 24, 2017.

Canadian conductor Bernard Labadie is a specialist in Baroque and Classical repertoire who “moulds the phrases, plucks out all-important details in the texture and radiates an infectious joy in the music” (The Telegraph). An Officer of the Order of Canada and a knight of Ordre national du Québec, Labadie is a regular guest with the premier orchestras across North America and gaining increasing renown in Europe. He now brings his musicianship to the COC for the first time to lead the internationally acclaimed COC Orchestra and Chorus through some of Mozart’s most beautiful and infectious melodies.

The COC production was conceived by Tony Award®-winning director Diane Paulus with a purposeful sense of fun, playfulness and whimsy in this theatrical version of Mozart’s humorous, sometimes profound, exploration of the trials of growing up, seeking ideals and finding love. COC Ensemble Studio graduate and artistic director at the Thousand Islands Playhouse, Ashlie Corcoran, makes her COC mainstage debut staging the 2017 revival, based on Paulus’ original direction. The production is full of wonder and wisdom in following the adventures of Prince Tamino as he undergoes feats of heroism to rescue his love, Pamina, from the forces of evil.

The look and feel of the COC’s production evokes an 18th-century storybook sensibility in its costume and set design by acclaimed designer Myung Hee Cho with slight contemporary touches in colours and textures. The period feel carries through in the lighting design by Scott Zielinski who incorporates such 18th-century performance practices as candles, torches, and reflections off shiny surfaces and mirrors. The production conjures up a play-within-a-play scenario with the guests of a young girl’s name day celebration finding themselves entertained by an opera to only become the characters themselves, with the line between performer and audience quickly blurring. The ensuing trials and tribulations of the play travel through the girl’s home and take place over the course of one night, beginning at evening and ending at dawn.

Leading the young cast are two breakout tenors from the COC’s own Ensemble Studio, recent graduates Andrew Haji and Owen McCausland, who share the role of Prince Tamino. They are matched with two sopranos to watch: Russian Elena Tsallagova and Canadian Kirsten MacKinnon, singing the role of Princess Pamina, in their Canadian and COC debuts, respectively.

Two of the finest baritones of their generation, Canadians Joshua Hopkins and Phillip Addis, return to the COC to share the role of the bird catcher, Papageno. COC Ensemble Studio graduate soprano Jacqueline Woodley, heard last season as the Forest Bird in Siegfried, brings her exceptional talent to the role of Papageno’s sweetheart, Papagena.

The Queen of the Night is brought to life by the thrilling coloratura of COC Ensemble Studio graduate soprano Ambur Braid.

The priest-king Sarastro is sung by Croatian bass Goran Jurić, in his Canadian debut, and American bass Matt Boehler. The roles of Monostatos and the Speaker are sung by two notable voices on the international opera scene, COC Ensemble Studio graduate tenor Michael Colvin and German baritone Martin Gantner, respectively.

Rounding out the cast are many new and returning Ensemble Studio members: graduate soprano Aviva Fortunata, mezzo-soprano Emily D’Angelo, in her COC mainstage debut, and graduate mezzo-soprano Lauren Segal are the First, Second and Third Ladies, respectively; tenor Charles Sy sings the First Priest and is joined by baritone Bruno Roy, in his COC mainstage debut, as the Second Priest. Alternating in the role of the First Armed Man will be Ensemble Studio graduate tenors Owen McCausland and Andrew Haji, when not singing the role of Tamino, with graduate bass Neil Craighead as the Second Armed Man. Singing the First, Second and Third Spirits are members of the Canadian Children’s Opera Company.

The Magic Flute was Mozart’s final opera, receiving its premiere only three months before his death in December 1791. From the spectacular fireworks of the Queen of the Night to Pamina’s anguished lament and Papageno’s comic antics, the charm and profundity of Mozart’s music has made The Magic Flute a timeless classic in the years since with it consistently ranked as one of the most performed operas in the world.

The COC’s production of The Magic Flute is sung in German with English SURTITLESTM.

The COC performs The Magic Flute at the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts. The COC’s 16/17 season marks the 10th anniversary of the Four Seasons Centre, Canada’s first purpose-built opera house, which opened in fall 2006 and has been hailed internationally as one of the finest in the world.

TICKET INFORMATION

Single tickets for The Magic Flute range from $35 – $235 and box seats, when available, are $350. Tickets are now on sale, available online at coc.ca, by calling 416-363-8231, or in person at the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts Box Office (145 Queen St. W.). For more information on specially priced tickets available to young people under the age of 15, standing room, Opera Under 30 presented by TD Bank Group, student groups and rush seating, visit coc.ca.

Review:

The Canadian Opera Company’s “The Magic Flute” from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is an opera that digs deep into the psychopathy of what a ‘happy ending’ really means. The audience is immediately thrown into a play within a play and are tasked to feel out the emotional mayhem transforming itself in front of their eyes.

Indeed fairtyale like with injections of comedy throughout the over 2 hour production – the joyfully painted portraiture as seen through exuberant costuming and enthusiastic stage production is thwarted by the ‘in your face’ theme of the mistreatment of women in “The Magic Flute”.

This production is filled with robust romance and decadent melodrama. It is also a wonderful introduction to Mozart’s work.  “The Magic Flute” is accessible and indeed very hummable.  There was many a toe tapping and giggling felt in the aisles throughout the evening.

Cheeky, campiness and majesty aside, our heroine, Pamina is offered to the audience in a rich text for feminine critique. Pamina represents the ideal woman, a good wife and daughter. Her mother, the Queen of the Night, is all attitude, heavy on the melodrama and exciting.  Whereas Prince Tamino and Papageno show us aristocracy’s stiff upper lip in contrast to the court jester.

Director, Diane Paulus, states “We have set the action in 1791, the year in which the opera was first performed, against the backdrop of the Enlightenment. The entire play-within-a-play is presented in the open space of a nobleman’s garden, itself a place of enchantment and symbolic power during this historical period. As the drama unfolds, the actors leave the theatre behind and continue to enact their story in an elaborate labyrinth that covers the grounds of the estate. The theatricality of their journey is enhanced by the mysteries of the outdoor world beneath the cover of night where they act out the rituals of the drama. All distinctions between fantasy and reality fade away as their pageant lasts through the night until dawn.”

The staging of “The Magic Flute” is grand, complex and ethereal. It was indeed the icing on the cake.  Watching the singers and chorus frolic, clash and find a common ground amongst lit wall sconces, well-manicured shrubbery, revolving hedge doors and The Shining like passageways transported us into a European country side far away from big city living.

The arts and crafts paper dragons, alligators, birds and giraffes were a delight to see. The sparkles of glittery dresses, kitschy fire walls and umbrella festooned men in electric blue jumped off the stage.  These vignettes felt like a scene out of “Beauty School Drop Out” from Grease.  These simple artisan notes added a pop up experience to the production and again continued to hypnotize the audience into a light mood even though the textures of music brought a silence to linger upon and the idea if the end really does justify the means?

Be sure to dwell on the gorgeous sicilienne aria for “Queen of the Night” as sung by Ambur Braid. It is an athletic feat and beautifully curated.  Think puncture holes through the heart and mesmerizing all in one shot.  The aria’s provided a rocking rhythm throughout the production and emulated a cradle of sorrow for the audience to breathe in in small bursts.

Elena Tsallagova as Pamina, Goran Jurić as Sarastro and Andrew Haji as Tamino created a safe place for the audience to lean into and learn about Mozart’s art. Their performances also allowed one to reflect quietly on the intent behind their deliveries.

“The Magic Flute” leaves the audience with the ideals of “reason, wisdom and light” as a take away. Perhaps easy ideas to read on paper, but difficult after a production that has opened up a dialogue that touches upon themes that are au courant in today’s current political climate.  That said, “The Magic Flute” is an opera to be reckoned with.  Emanate a grateful nod to the Canadian Opera Company for providing food for thought and a deep breath as we commence 2017 together.

http://www.coc.ca/

Toronto Symphony Orchestra: Pop-Up Shop at Roy Thomson Hall

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On Saturday October 8, 2016 the Toronto Symphony is launching their very first TSO Pop-Up Shop at Roy Thomson Hall.

Items you should think of picking up just in time for holiday shopping season are hot off the press!

First of, TSO has collaborated with Toronto street artist ANSER to bring a Beethoven Collection limited-edition black shirt. It’ll be on sale before the concert and during the Beethoven & Tchaikovsky performance intermission on Saturday October 8, 2016. If you don’t have your tickets yet – get on it soon!  https://www.tso.ca/concert/beethoven-tchaikovsky

If you are not coming to Beethoven & Tchaikovsky – t-shirts will be available to purchase online starting on Saturday October 8, 2016.

While you are at it, pick up the Toronto Symphony Listening Guide, which has been bringing the TSO international attention. Voila, https://www.creativereview.co.uk/how-the-toronto-symphony-orchestra-uses-graphic-design-to-guide-its-audiences-though-its-music/.

The TSO Listening Guide has been shortlisted for a data visualization award from “Information is Beautiful”, which is based in London, England. The awards were founded by David McCandless – http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/about/

The list is now out for public voting. Here’s the link: http://www.informationisbeautifulawards.com/showcase/1322-toronto-symphony-orchestra-listening-guide

Bravo to the Toronto Symphony for blending classical music into street culture. Let’s keep classical music alive for generations to come!

https://www.tso.ca/

 

Toronto Symphony Orchestra: The Music of Abba Ticket Giveaway

FUN FACTS ABOUT ABBA

  • Before they were “ABBA” (the initials of the members’ first names), the band was known as “Festfolk”, meaning “party people” in Swedish.
  • ABBA’s greatest hits album, Gold, is one of the best-selling records of all time.
  • ABBA was well-known for performing in outrageous, sparkly outfits. Part of the reason they did so was for tax purposes—according to Swedish laws, the cost of clothes for performance (i.e. could not be worn as normal street clothes) was tax-deductible.
  • ABBA was one of the first groups to use videos to promote their music. Most of them were directed by Lasse Hallström, who received Academy Award nominations for the films My Life as a Dog and The Cider House Rules.

Steven Reineke conductor says, ‘Mamma mia, here we go again! Welcome to the first TSO Pops concert of the 2016/17 season! I’m delighted to welcome back to the TSO stage the extraordinary Finnish vocal ensemble, Rajaton, to perform the greatest hits of 70’s Swedish pop sensation, ABBA. As always, Rajaton bring their infectious energy and dazzling vocals to interpret the music of one of the most commercially successful music groups of all time—ABBA’s songs continue to remain ever popular, decades after they hit No. 1 on worldwide music charts.  And it’s not difficult to see why—especially when you hear them with the full forces of your Toronto Symphony Orchestra!’.

Thank you to our friends at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra for gifting Thirty Four Flavours with a pair of tickets to The Music of Abba for their Tuesday October 4, 2016 performance!

What are the rules when entering the Thirty Four Flavours and Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway?

Simple! Please sign up to Thirty Four Flavours Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thirtyfourflavours, Twitter https://twitter.com/34flavours, or email subscription to enter the draw. When you have signed up please send me a Facebook message, a tweet or email (thirtyfourflavours@gmail.com) telling me you why you want to win the Symphony tickets.

Deadline for the Thirty Four Flavours and The Music of Abba Ticket Giveaway is Saturday October 1, 2016.

Here’s the scoop!

Twitter: @TorontoSymphony

Facebook: facebook.com/torontosymphonyorchestra

YouTube: youtube.com/torontosymphony

Instagram: instagram.com/torontosymphony

About the TSO: Founded in 1922, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra is one of Canada’s most important cultural institutions, recognized internationally. Music Director Peter Oundjian leads the TSO with a commitment to innovative programming and audience development through a broad range of performances that showcase the exceptional talents of the Orchestra along with a roster of distinguished guest artists and conductors. The TSO also serves the larger community with TSOUNDCHECK, the original under-35 ticket program; the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra; and music-education programs that reach tens of thousands of students each year.

https://www.tso.ca/

Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway: The Second City Guide to the Symphony (June 23 – June 25, 2016)

Spring has finally sprung in Toronto! What better time is it then to get out there and enjoy what makes the Toronto Symphony Orchestra great!

Back by popular demand! The legendary Second City comedy theatre and the TSO team up once again to bring back this hit show, filled with sketch comedy, satire, songs, improvisation, and of course, incredible classical music. This light-hearted comic performance will take on all things orchestral, from the colourful musicians to the mighty Maestro, from send-ups of classical music history and conventions to the manners and mannerisms of our beloved audiences.

Thank you to our friends at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra for gifting Thirty Four Flavours with a pair of The Second City Guide to the Symphony tickets for the June 23, 2016 performance!

What are the rules when entering the Thirty Four Flavours and Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway?

Simple! Please sign up to Thirty Four Flavours Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thirtyfourflavours, Twitter https://twitter.com/34flavours, or email subscription to enter the draw. When you have signed up please send me a Facebook message, a tweet or email (thirtyfourflavours@gmail.com) telling me you why you want to win The Second City Guide to the Symphony tickets.

Deadline for the Thirty Four Flavours and Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway is Tuesday June 21, 2016.

Here’s the scoop!

https://www.tso.ca/concert/second-city-guide-symphony

Twitter: @TorontoSymphony

Facebook: facebook.com/torontosymphonyorchestra

YouTube: youtube.com/torontosymphony

Instagram: instagram.com/torontosymphony

About the TSO: Founded in 1922, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra is one of Canada’s most important cultural institutions, recognized internationally. Music Director Peter Oundjian leads the TSO with a commitment to innovative programming and audience development through a broad range of performances that showcase the exceptional talents of the Orchestra along with a roster of distinguished guest artists and conductors. The TSO also serves the larger community with TSOUNDCHECK, the original under-35 ticket program; the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra; and music-education programs that reach tens of thousands of students each year.

Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway: The Decades Project 1910-1919 – Ravel Daphnis et Chloé

Spring has finally sprung in Toronto! What better time is it then to get out there and enjoy what makes the Toronto Symphony Orchestra great!

Under the inspiring baton of Basque conductor Juanjo Mena, this riveting program of masterpieces from the second decade of the 20th century brings you Ravel’s voluptuous mythological ballet score, Daphnis et Chloé, in its full, original version. Charismatic Finnish violinist Pekka Kuusisto performs the robust Violin Concerto by Danish composer Carl Nielsen, three of whose symphonies the TSO performed to great acclaim last season.

Pekka Kuusisto will be signing CDs post concert in the North Lobby on June 1 and 2.

Thank you to our friends at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra for gifting Thirty Four Flavours with a pair of The Decades Project 1910-1919 – Ravel Daphnis et Chloé tickets for the June 2, 2016 performance!

What are the rules when entering the Thirty Four Flavours and Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway?

Simple! Please sign up to Thirty Four Flavours Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thirtyfourflavours, Twitter https://twitter.com/34flavours, or email subscription to enter the draw. When you have signed up please send me a Facebook message, a tweet or email (thirtyfourflavours@gmail.com) telling me you why you want to win The Decades Project 1910-1919 – Ravel Daphnis et Chloé tickets. By the way, stay tuned I have more tickets to TSO to giveaway in the weeks ahead!

Deadline for the Thirty Four Flavours and Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway is Wednesday May 31, 2016.

Here’s the scoop!

https://www.tso.ca/concert/ravel-daphnis-et-chloé

Twitter: @TorontoSymphony

Facebook: facebook.com/torontosymphonyorchestra

YouTube: youtube.com/torontosymphony

Instagram: instagram.com/torontosymphony

About the TSO: Founded in 1922, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra is one of Canada’s most important cultural institutions, recognized internationally. Music Director Peter Oundjian leads the TSO with a commitment to innovative programming and audience development through a broad range of performances that showcase the exceptional talents of the Orchestra along with a roster of distinguished guest artists and conductors. The TSO also serves the larger community with TSOUNDCHECK, the original under-35 ticket program; the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra; and music-education programs that reach tens of thousands of students each year.

Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway: ‘What Makes It Great?® Dvořák Symphony 8’

Spring has finally sprung in Toronto! What better time is it then to get out there and enjoy what makes the Toronto Symphony Orchestra great!

Through the ever-popular What Makes It Great?® series, engaging classical music expert, conductor, and host Rob Kapilow offers tips on what to listen for and looks at the intricacies of a variety of works. On May 19, for the final concert in the series, Czech composer Antonín Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8 is examined during the first half of the evening. Following intermission, the audience is treated to a full performance of this timeless, warm-hearted piece with fresh insight and perspective.

Thank you to our friends at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra for gifting Thirty Four Flavours with a pair of ‘What Makes It Great?® Dvořák Symphony 8’ tickets!

What are the rules when entering the Thirty Four Flavours and Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway?

Simple! Please sign up to Thirty Four Flavours Facebook https://www.facebook.com/thirtyfourflavours, Twitter https://twitter.com/34flavours, or email subscription to enter the draw. When you have signed up please send me a Facebook message, a tweet or email (thirtyfourflavours@gmail.com) telling me you why you want to win ‘What Makes It Great?® Dvořák Symphony 8’ tickets. By the way, stay tuned I have more tickets to TSO to giveaway in the weeks ahead!

Deadline for the Thirty Four Flavours and Toronto Symphony Orchestra Ticket Giveaway is Wednesday May 18, 2016.

Here’s the scoop!

What Makes It Great?® Dvořák Symphony 8

Thursday, May 19 at 7:30pm

Rob Kapilow, conductor & host

Dvořák: Symphony No. 8

TICKETS: $34.75–$83.75

Twitter: @TorontoSymphony

Facebook: facebook.com/torontosymphonyorchestra

YouTube: youtube.com/torontosymphony

Instagram: instagram.com/torontosymphony

About the TSO: Founded in 1922, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra is one of Canada’s most important cultural institutions, recognized internationally. Music Director Peter Oundjian leads the TSO with a commitment to innovative programming and audience development through a broad range of performances that showcase the exceptional talents of the Orchestra along with a roster of distinguished guest artists and conductors. The TSO also serves the larger community with TSOUNDCHECK, the original under-35 ticket program; the Toronto Symphony Youth Orchestra; and music-education programs that reach tens of thousands of students each year.